Browse Exhibits (9 total)

The Way of Wisdom: Building DePaul University Libraries

The Way of Wisdom: Building DePaul University Libraries celebrates the 20th Anniversary of the building of the John T. Richardson Library, looks back at the various libraries housed in buildings across campus, and forward to the renovation of the Richardson Library building and the establishment of the Information Commons.

The exhibition was on display from January – June 2013 on the first floor of the John T. Richardson Library. A companion exhibit, The Enduring Legacy of Rare Gifts, looked at “DePaul’s acquisition of significant book collections and highlights the contributions made by notable donors” since the founding of the library.

The materials in this exhibition are drawn from DePaul University Special Collections and Archives. To view items, contact archives@depaul.edu or visit the department.

Exploring Vincent de Paul's Mediterranean: Western Europe and the Barbary Coast, 1580-1760

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During the lifetime of St. Vincent de Paul (1581-1660), and the century following his death, the Mediterranean Sea operated as a theater of conflict, commerce, and cultural intercourse. It acted as both contested and connective tissues between Europe and the North African Barbary Coast.

The Sea was the context and structure, enabler and constraint, for Vincent de Paul’s France, its geopolitical actions, its mercantile ambitions, and its relationship with North Africa.

The Enduring Legacy of Rare Gifts

The Enduring Legacy of Rare Gifts traces DePaul University Library's acquisition of significant book collections and highlights the contributions made by notable donors since the founding of the library. These collections are now housed in the Department of Special Collections and Archives.
The exhibition was on display from January – June 2013 in the Special Collections and Archives reading room on the third floor of the John T. Richardson Library. A companion exhibit, The Way of Wisdom: Building DePaul University Libraries, celebrates the 20th Anniversary of the building of the John T. Richardson Library.
The materials in this exhibition are drawn from DePaul University Special Collections and Archives. To view items, contact archives@depaul.edu or visit the department.

Retro Fall at DePaul

Retro Fall at DePaul looks at back-to-school traditions from DePaul University's past. 

The exhibition is on display throughout the fall of 2013 on the first floor of the John T. Richardson Library. 

The materials in this exhibition are drawn from DePaul University Special Collections and Archives. To view items, contact archives@depaul.edu or visit the department.

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Engendered: Seen + Heard (Part 1: Women and War)

Engendered Seen + Heard: Women and War is the first in a series of exhibits to honor the actions and words of women whose works we hold in our collections. With a focus on the French Revolution, the American Civil War, and World War I, the women in this exhibit represent a wide range of sentiments on the role of women in society.

In the century and a half that spanned the French Revolution to World War I, it was a commonly held belief that women were biologically and intellectually inferior to men. As such, their role was relegated to the private domestic sphere where they tended to the home and family. However, the necessities induced by war placed women from virtually every social level into public roles in the work force, military, and politics. Not content to relinquish the new freedoms and opportunities that came with their more active public participation, many of these women used these experiences to vigorously advocate for rights that were denied to them by virtue of their gender.

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a Diffusion of Useful Knowldge

What consititutes useful knowledge? This exhibit looks at both what knowledge was deemed important from the 18th century Enlightement Encyclopédie to the influence of Benjamin Franklin to the 19th cenutry Lyceum Movement and how that knowledge was conveyed. The name of the exhibit was inspired by the influential English Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge that published numerous inexpensive texts aimed at the self-education of the masses.

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Before Waterloo: Imminent Danger

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The British may have triumphed against Napoleon Bonaparte's forces on the fields of Waterloo in 1815, but prior to their success, anxiety pervaded the island nation.

This exhibit looks at reactions to Napoleon’s threatened land invasion of England. It begins from the vantage point of the diplomats and policy-makers who tried to broker peace and continues through the spate of nationalist sentiment expressed in popular publications and satires, the voluntary responses of citizens willing to form local defensive units, and finally some of the more grandiose, if improbable, strategies including the use of hot air balloons to convey troops across the Channel and analyzing Napoleon’s astrological chart as a way to forecast his downfall. 

Along with the companion exhibit, Waterloo@200: The Legacy, these exhibits mark the 200-year anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo and highlight collection strengths in DePaul's Special Collections and Archives.

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Waterloo at 200

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At its 200th anniversary, the Battle of Waterloo remains a watershed moment in European history. Despite Napoleon Bonaparte's long and triumphant career in warfare, he remains best known for his defeat at Waterloo on June 18, 1815. What was the significance of this battle, and why does it continue to captivate the public imagination after two centuries?

This exhibit is the companion to the exhibit Waterloo at 200: Napoleon and the Battle that Changed the World, originally displayed in the James T. Richardson Library at DePaul University in the winter of 2015.

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In Deeds and Words: Sr. Helen Prejean's Ministry Against the Death Penalty

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In Deeds and Words: Sr. Helen Prejean's Ministry Against the Death Penalty examines the ministry of Sister Helen Prejean, CSJ, well known for her work to abolish the death penalty in the United States, and especially for her book, Dead Man Walking.

Sr. Helen Prejean donated her papers to DePaul University's Special Collections and Archives Department in December 2010, following conversations begun by Susanne Dumbleton of DePaul's School for New Learning. Dumbleton interviewed Sr. Helen in 2009 for a book about women leaders in social justice movements, and raised the issue then of a possible donation. Sr. Helen's previous connections to DePaul University include an honorary degree, and work with the Center for Justice in Capital Cases (CJCC), headed by the College of Law's Andrea Lyon, one of the nation's leading death penalty attorneys.

The original letters, photographs, artifacts selected for this exhibit are from the Sr. Helen Prejean Papers and were on display in DePaul's Special Collections and Archives Department from May 2012 through January 2013.  The archives collection has enormous depth, not only for the issue of the death penalty, but also in the development of Sr. Helen's activism, the process of writing and publishing a book, and the overlapping social justice issues which examination of the death penalty unmasks.

The Sr. Helen Prejean Papers are available for research use in DePaul's Special Collections and Archives Department Reading Room.  For more information about the collection, please email archives@depaul.edu or visit the department.